Minor in Poverty, Justice and Human Capabilities

Program Learning Outcomes for the Minor in Poverty, Justice and Human Capabilities

Upon completing the minor in Poverty, Justice and Human Capabilities, students will:

  1. Understand theoretical approaches to poverty and justice that draw from the capabilities framework, economics, history, sociology, philosophy, and other fields. Students will have in-depth knowledge of approaches to enhancing human flourishing and will understand the social, institutional, and political contexts that underlie deprivations and inequities.
  2. Demonstrate a sophisticated understanding of the multiple influences on well-being beyond income and material wealth, including gender, racial, and ethnic disparities, and the impact of colonialism on the Global South. Students will be able to provide examples from different geographic regions,  not exclusively from one country or region, and be able to apply the capabilities approach when evaluating these disparities.
  3. Gain, through direct service, experiential knowledge of the challenges faced in disadvantaged communities.
  4. Achieve an interdisciplinary knowledge of approaches to enhancing human well-being and mitigating human deprivations. Students will be able to apply this knowledge in evaluating potential policy solutions.
  5. Demonstrate the oral, written, and visual communication skills essential for sophisticated and successful advocacy.
  6. Become a global citizen by understanding the role that advocacy and service play in addressing poverty, strengthening justice, and improving well-being. 

Requirements for the Minor in Poverty, Justice and Human Capabilities

Students pursuing the minor in Poverty, Justice and Human Capabilities must complete:

  • A minimum of 6 courses (18 credit hours) to satisfy minor requirements.
  • A minimum of 3 PJHC Service Credits from the direct service learning experiences.

The courses used to meet the PJHC minor are open to all Rice students, including those not pursuing the minor; however, in some courses with limited space, preference will be given to declared minors.

The courses listed below satisfy the requirements for this minor. In certain instances, courses not on this official list may be substituted upon approval of the minor’s academic advisor (or official certifier).  Students and their academic advisors should identify and clearly document the courses to be taken.

Summary

Total Credit Hours Required for the Interdisciplinary Minor in Poverty, Justice and Human Capabilities18

Minor Requirements

Core Requirements
HUMA 371 / SOCI 371POVERTY, JUSTICE, AND HUMAN CAPABILITIES 13
SWGS 394 / SOCI 394HUMAN DEVELOPMENT IN GLOBAL AND LOCAL COMMUNITIES3
Elective Requirements
Select 3 electives (see below)9
Capstone Requirement 2
Select 1 of the following options:3-7
Capstone Course Option
RACE, EDUCATION AND SOCIETY IN THE URBAN SOUTH
ADVANCED SEMINAR IN POVERTY, JUSTICE, AND CAPABILITIES
Capstone Course Sequences Option
Select 1 of the following:
COMMUNITY BRIDGES TRAINING
and INEQUALITY AND URBAN LIFE
PRE-SEMINAR IN ENGAGED RESEARCH
and ENGAGED RESEARCH PRACTICUM
and ENGAGED RESEARCH SEMINAR
Total Credit Hours18

Footnotes and Additional Information 

Elective Requirements

Students must complete a total of 3 courses (minimum of 9 credit hours) as listed below to satisfy the Poverty, Justice and Human Capabilities minor's Elective Requirements. An additional course from the Non-Western or Race and Ethnicity list can be used to fulfill the General Elective requirement. Students must select separate courses to fulfill the Non-Western and Race and Ethnicity requirements. Additionally, the 3 required elective courses must come from at least 2 different schools. As course offerings may vary from year to year, students are urged to consult with the undergraduate advisors (see http://pjhc.rice.edu/) at the beginning of each semester. Please note that not all courses listed below will be offered every academic year. 

Non-Western Courses
Select 1-2 from the following:3-6
PERSPECTIVES ON MODERN ASIA
NEOLIBERALISM AND GLOBALIZATION
NEW RELIGIOUS MOVEMENTS IN AFRICA
THE WORLD AND SOUTH ASIA
RELIGIONS FROM INDIA
SEX, MONEY, AND POWER AROUND THE WORLD
TEMPLES, TECHNOLOGY, AND TRANSITION: INDIA IN THE 21ST CENTURY
MODERN GIRL AND ASIA IN THE WORLD
INTRODUCTION TO THIRD WORLD LITERATURE
CONTEMPORARY ANGLOPHONE LITERATURES
CONTEMPORARY CHINA
BLACKS IN THE AMERICAS
COLONIAL SPANISH AMERICA
LATIN AMERICAN CULTURAL TRADITIONS
MODERN LATIN AMERICA
INTRODUCTION TO AFRICAN HISTORY: NORTH, WEST, AND CENTRAL AFRICA: EARLY TIMES TO PRESENT
INTRODUCTION TO AFRICAN HISTORY: EAST, CENTRAL, AND SOUTHERN AFRICA, EARLY TIMES TO PRESENT
CONTINUITIES AND CHANGES IN BRAZILIAN HISTORY
MODERN SLAVERY
HISTORY OF SOUTH ASIA
MODERN ARAB HISTORY
THE CARIBBEAN IN THE AGE OF REVOLUTION, 1770-1820
POVERTY AND SOCIAL JUSTICE IN LATIN AMERICA
ATLANTIC SLAVE TRADE AND THE ORIGINS OF AFRO AMERICA
THE CULTURE OF IDENTITY POLITICS IN CONTEMPORARY BRAZIL
CARIBBEAN HISTORY TO 1838
CARIBBEAN HISTORY 1838 TO PRESENT
MODERN CHINA
NATURAL DISASTERS IN THE CARIBBEAN
MIGRATIONS AND DIASPORAS IN THE INDIAN OCEAN WORLD
MODERN SLAVERY AND HUMAN TRAFFICKING: GLOBAL AND LOCAL
TOPICS IN LATIN AMERICAN HISTORY
SPECIAL TOPICS (minimum of 3 credit hours, Note: not all topics will count towards the minor)
COMPARATIVE URBAN POLITICS AND POLICY
GENDER AND POLITICS IN THE MIDDLE EAST
SEX, GENDER, AND POLITICAL REPRESENTATION IN LATIN AMERICA
INTRODUCTION TO AFRICAN RELIGIONS
GENDER AND ISLAM
THEOLOGY IN AFRICA
CHRISTIANITY AND ISLAM IN AFRICA
MAJOR ISSUES IN CONTEMPORARY ISLAM
RELIGION AND POLITICS IN AFRICA
RELIGION AND LITERATURE IN AFRICA
THE CITY IN LATIN AMERICA
Race and Ethnicity Courses  
Select 1-2 from the following:3-6
ASIAN AMERICAN CONTEMPORARY COMMUNITIES
ANTHROPOLOGY OF RACE, ETHNICITY AND HEALTH
RACE, CLASS, GENDER IN EDUCATION
URBAN EDUCATION: ISSUES, POLICY, AND PRACTICE
THE AMERICAN WEST AND ITS OTHERS
CHICANO/A LITERATURE
YOUTH STUDIES
BLACK MANHATTAN: 1915-1940
THE BLACK IMAGINARY: 1775-PRESENT
STUDIES IN CHICANO/A LITERATURE
BLACKS IN THE AMERICAS
U.S. WOMEN'S HISTORY I: COLONIAL BEGINNINGS TO THE CIVIL WAR
U.S. WOMEN'S HISTORY II: CIVIL WAR TO THE PRESENT
CONTINUITIES AND CHANGES IN BRAZILIAN HISTORY
SLAVERY AND THE FOUNDING FATHERS
MODERN SLAVERY
THE CARIBBEAN IN THE AGE OF REVOLUTION, 1770-1820
THE AMERICAN SOUTH
CARIBBEAN HISTORY 1838 TO PRESENT
19TH CENTURY WOMEN'S NARRATIVES
JEWISH HISTORY, 1500-1948
THE TEN MOST IMPORTANT SUPREME COURT DECISIONS IN U.S. HISTORY
RACE, EDUCATION AND SOCIETY IN THE URBAN SOUTH
MODERN SLAVERY AND HUMAN TRAFFICKING: GLOBAL AND LOCAL
U.S.: MEXICO BORDER ISSUES IN COMPARATIVE PERSEPCTIVE
RELIGION AND HIP HOP CULTURE IN AMERICA
INTRODUCTION TO THE BLACK CHURCH IN THE UNITED STATES
THE RELIGIOUS THOUGHT OF MARTIN L. KING, JR. AND MALCOLM X
WHAT'S RELIGIOUS ABOUT BLACK RELIGION?
SOCIAL INEQUALITY
RACE AND ETHNIC RELATIONS
MULTIRACIAL AMERICA
AFRICAN AMERICAN-JEWISH RELATIONS: RACE, RELIGION, POLITICS, AND POPULAR CULTURE
SOCIOLOGY OF EDUCATION
IMMIGRATION IN A GLOBAL WORLD
INEQUALITY AND URBAN LIFE
THE FUTURE OF FOOD: FEMINIST, QUEER, AND CRITICAL APPROACHES
General Elective Courses
Select up to 1 from the following (or select an additional Non-Western or Race and Ethnicity Elective)0-3
ETHNOGRAPHIES OF CARE
MEDICAL ANTHROPOLOGY
SPECIAL TOPICS (minimum of 3 credit hours. Note: not all topics will count towards the minor)
APPROPRIATE DESIGN FOR GLOBAL HEALTH
HEALTH ECONOMICS
QUEER LITERARY CULTURES
FEMINIST THEORY
INTRODUCTION TO GLOBAL HEALTH
PRINCIPLES OF PUBLIC AND COMMUNITY HEALTH
DISPARITIES IN HEALTH IN AMERICA
HISTORY OF FEMINISM
AMERICAN RADICALS AND REFORMERS
HIST 438 / SWGS 438
GENDER AND HISTORY
WESTERN EUROPEAN WELFARE STATE, 1880-1980: ORIGINS, CONSOLIDATIONS, CRISIS
HISTORY OF HUMAN RIGHTS
SOCIAL AND POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY
THE LEGAL FRAMEWORK OF RELIGIOUS TOLERANCE
URBAN POLITICS
REPRESENTATION AND POLICY MAKING
EDUCATION POLICY
PSYCHOLOGY OF GENDER
SOCIOLOGY OF GENDER
SOCIOLOGY OF WORK AND OCCUPATIONS
MEDICAL SOCIOLOGY
SOCIOLOGY OF DISASTER
HEALTH DISPARITIES IN THE UNITED STATES
GENDER SEMINAR
SOCIOLOGY OF FOOD
POPULATION HEALTH SEMINAR
FAMILY SEMINAR
GENDER AND HEALTH
INTRODUCTION TO WOMEN & GENDER
INTRODUCTION TO LESBIAN, GAY, BISEXUAL, AND TRANSGENDER STUDIES
SEXUAL DEBATES IN THE U.S.: SOCIAL AND CULTURAL CONTEXTS OF SUPREME COURTS DECISIONS
ADVANCED SEMINAR IN POVERTY, JUSTICE, AND CAPABILITIES
ENGAGED RESEARCH SEMINAR

Direct Service Learning Experience

As part of the Poverty, Justice and Human Capabilities (PJHC) requirements, students must participate in an approved PJHC direct service learning experience. Students must complete 3 PJHC service credits. Students can choose from an array of options, including internships, service trips, and coursework, to complete this requirement. Direct service learning experiences carry 1, 2, or 3 service credits. These options are described in detail at http://pjhc.rice.edu/service-learning-requirement/

Policies for the Minor in Poverty, Justice and Human Capabilities

Program Restrictions and Exclusions

Students pursuing the minor in Poverty, Justice and Human Capabilities should be aware of the following program restriction:

  • As noted in Majors, Minors, and Certificates, i.) students may declare their intent to pursue a minor only after they have first declared a major, and ii.) students may not major and minor in the same subject.

Transfer Credit 

For Rice University’s policy regarding transfer credit, see Transfer Credit. Some departments and programs have additional restrictions on transfer credit. The Office of Academic Advising maintains the university’s official list of transfer credit advisors on their website: http://oaa.rice.edu. Students are encouraged to meet with their academic program’s transfer credit advisor when considering transfer credit possibilities. 

Program Transfer Credit Guidelines

Students pursuing the minor in Poverty, Justice and Human Capabilities should be aware of the following program-specific transfer credit guidelines:

  • Requests for transfer credit will be considered by the program director (and/or the program’s official transfer credit advisor) on an individual case-by-case basis. 

For additional information, please see the Poverty, Justice and Human Capabilities website: http://pjhc.rice.edu/

Opportunities for the Minor in Poverty, Justice and Human Capabilities

Academic Honors

The university recognizes academic excellence achieved over an undergraduate’s academic history at Rice. For information on university honors, please see Latin Honors (summa cum laude, magna cum laude, and cum laude) and Distinction in Research and Creative Work. Some departments have department-specific Honors awards or designations.

Susan McAshan Summer Service Internship

Declared Poverty, Justice and Human Capabilities minors are eligible to apply for funding to support a summer service internship. Students must have completed HUMA 371/SOCI 371, SOCI 394/SWGS 394, and at least one approved elective by the end of the spring semester before their internships. Funding supports student interns’ direct service work with international or US-based community service organizations. Students receive 3 service credits upon the completion of their Susan McAshan Summer Service Internship. Additional details may be found at the PJHC website: http://pjhc.rice.edu/summer-service-internship-funding/

See https://humanities.rice.edu/student-life for tables of fellowships, prizes, and internships/practica that may be relevant to this minor.